Friday, April 30, 2010

My Bookmarks and Annotations 04/30/2010

  • The academic achievement gap between poor and non-poor students is well-known. Low-income children consistently fall behind their peers in test scores, graduation rates, college enrollment, and other measures of academic success. Both state and federal policymakers have recently made significant efforts to adopt reforms designed to address this problem. Some reforms have focused on creating high standards of achievement coupled with systems of testing and accountability. Other reforms have focused on improving the quality of education for low-income students by targeting additional financial resources to the school districts that serve them to improve instruction, facilities, and other academic resources. A significant body of research suggests that targeting additional resources to districts serving low-income children can narrow the academic achievement gap between poor and non-poor students.
    This paper reviews and summarizes the results of current research on education funding for low-income children. It examines the findings of researchers and analysts in three areas: the overall relationship between education funding and student performance; recent estimates of the amount of additional funding necessary to narrow the poverty-based academic achievement gap; and specific resource-intensive strategies that have been shown to benefit students in general and low-income students in particular. The most recent, comprehensive studies indicate that school funding and student performance are strongly related. In particular, they find that low-income children can substantially benefit from policies designed to provide additional resources to high-poverty school districts. New research, however, indicates that the amount of additional resources necessary to reduce the achievement gap is significant and may not be reflected in current state funding policies. The research findings are summarized below:

    tags: LowIncome, i3

  • Click on any of the links below to perform a new searchERIC #: EJ794311Title: Educational Sequelae of High School MisbehaviorAuthors: Finn, Jeremy D.; Fish, Reva M.; Scott, Leslie A.Descriptors: High Schools; Behavior Problems; Dropout Rate; Longitudinal Studies; High School Students; Juvenile Gangs; Violence; Grades (Scholastic); Scores; Tests; Graduation Rate; Classroom EnvironmentSource: Journal of Educational Research, v101 n5 p259-274 May-Jun 2008Peer-Reviewed: YesPublisher: Heldref Publications. 1319 Eighteenth Street NW, Washington, DC 20036-1802. Tel: 800-365-9753; Tel: 202-296-6267; Fax: 202-293-6130; e-mail: subscribe@heldref.org; Web site: http://www.heldref.orgPublication Date: 2008-00-00Pages: 16Pub Types: Journal Articles; Reports - EvaluativeAbstract: Despite the fact that misbehavior in school is a pervasive problem to educators and despite its adverse consequences, few researchers have examined the range of misbehaviors by students, their antecedents, or their consequences. The authors used data from the National Education Longitudinal Survey of 1988 (NELS:88) conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to examine immediate and long-term educational sequelae of misbehavior in high school. The authors constructed an extent of serious misconduct (ESM) measure based on classroom and school misbehaviors, ranging from classroom disruption to fighting and gang membership. The authors first examined relationships among specific misbehaviors and the relationship of ESM to student and school demographic characteristics. Second, the authors studied relationships of ESM with high school and post-high school academic outcomes. Misbehavior was related to high school grades, test scores, and graduation and dropout rates. Misbehavior also was related to entering a postsecondary program of study and completing a postsecondary program. In both cases, well-behaved students were more likely to participate in postsecondary education than were moderately misbehaving students, but moderately mis-b

    tags: behavior, i3

  • Educational Sequelae of High School Misbehavior
    Despite the fact that misbehavior in school is a pervasive problem to educators and despite its adverse consequences, few researchers have examined the range of misbehaviors by students, their antecedents, or their consequences. The authors used data from the National Education Longitudinal Survey of 1988 (NELS:88) conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to examine immediate and long-term educational sequelae of misbehavior in high school. The authors constructed an extent of serious misconduct (ESM) measure based on classroom and school misbehaviors, ranging from classroom disruption to fighting and gang membership. The authors first examined relationships among specific misbehaviors and the relationship of ESM to student and school demographic characteristics. Second, the authors studied relationships of ESM with high school and post-high school academic outcomes. Misbehavior was related to high school grades, test scores, and graduation and dropout rates. Misbehavior also was related to entering a postsecondary program of study and completing a postsecondary program. In both cases, well-behaved students were more likely to participate in postsecondary education than were moderately misbehaving students, but moderately misbehaving students did not participate more than did seriously misbehaving students. The authors discussed results in terms of the need to understand more about the structure of school-related misbehavior and the antecedents of misbehavior, including characteristics of classrooms and schools that may exacerbate student misconduct. Keywords: academic outcomes, educational sequelae, high school misbehavior

    tags: behavior, i3


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Thursday, April 29, 2010

My Bookmarks and Annotations 04/29/2010

  • The scholarship of teaching and learning Spring 2002     ISSN 1096-1453     Volume 6, Issue 1 
    Improving Student Attendance:  Does it Improve Student Learning?   76a 76b 76c Robert E. Ledman, Morehouse College, GA Felix Kamuche, Morehouse College, GA

    tags: attendance, i3

  • Henry Thiele, IT director for District 207 says he is “surprised by how many schools don’t even know that [Google apps] is there.” And, when they hear about the opportunity, says, Thiele, they’re curious to know “what the catch is.” Thiele simply responds, “There is no catch.”

    Boosting Student Motivation and Performance
    “Our students involved in this program are increasing their reading ability at rates faster than anything we’ve seen before,” says Thiele. He is referring to an English course which pairs high-risk 9th graders with their own laptop. District 207 expects an average gain of three points on reading tests over the course of the year, and observes that at-risk students’ scores typically either stay stagnant, or fall behind. For those in this program, scores have skyrocketed between 8 and 10 points. While Google Apps alone was not the only factor in raising test scores, its low cost and collaborative nature made the 1-to-1 curriculum possible.

    tags: googleapps, google_apps, web2.0, Thiele

  • PowerPoint has become public enemy number one for many US officers who find themselves battling slide presentations rather than insurgents.Some have gone as far as to declare all-out war on the software after the military command was over-run with mind-numbing 30-slide presentations.

    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worldnews/article-1269463/Afghanistan-PowerPoint-slide-Generals-left-baffled-PowerPoint-slide.html#ixzz0mQ59rWKL

    tags: powerpoint, visualization


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Friday, April 16, 2010

The Day the Nings Died

A long, long time ago...
I can still remember
How that music used to make me smile.
And I knew if I had my chance
That I could make those people dance
And, maybe, they’d be happy for a while.

But February made me shiver
With every paper I’d deliver.
Bad news on the doorstep;
I couldn’t take one more step.

I can’t remember if I cried
When I read about his widowed bride,
But something touched me deep inside
The day the music Nings died.

I was greeted this morning by an English department chair in all black. She is mourning the loss of Ning. Although
yesterday’s announcement is not good news, it is not unexpected or the end of classroom collaboration in a social networking environment.

My Grandfather was famous for using the saying “if it is too good to be true, it probably is” and I grew up hearing the phrase, so when it comes to stuff at no cost I am always cautious. For those of you that know me as Google Fan Boy #1” this may come as a surprise statement, but I always believe everything will eventually go away. Accepting that from the start makes the end much easier to take. However, I don’t look at it as a bad thing, I think of it as an opportunity. The death of one creates room for the emergence of another. Sure the new may not be the old, but it causes us to learn and change and from that comes new ideas.

Step back 10 years to the “dot-com” crash, which at the time, to some, looked like it might be the death of the on-line world. Out of the ashes rose powerhouses like Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Wikipedia with models never seen before in the world. Ning isn’t even dead yet and the
conversations have begun of how to replace it. Several people have said, and I agree, that it is time for us in EdTech to be forced to change and adapt - time for us to expect from ourselves that of which we expect from our teachers.

So let’s approach the problem from what we know and then ask some questions:

  • Ning probably will not be free any more.
    • At what price would you be willing to pay to keep the service?
  • There wasn’t another product like Ning that combined a pleasing and usable interface.
    • What were the components that made it work in the classroom?
    • Can we find something that fits those needs?
  • The management of the Ning was so easy.
    • Is it possible to get Ning to create an enterprise version of their product?
What if Ning comes back and announces that subscriptions for educators are $10 per year? I am sure plenty of people would pay up. IIf Ning created a version that I could purchase for my teachers and manage the accounts, and have a long term contract, I would consider becoming a paid subscriber at the district level. However, they would have to demonstrate that the product would have an escape plan. The biggest problem I see in leaving Ning, and any platform, is the cost and time involved in leaving. There is a real cost associated in leaving any product and we should always consider that when investing in a solution.

So, let’s all take a step back and examine our options, wait for an official announcement on the future of Nings, and prepare an exit strategy for every product we rely on. We should also take a moment to thank Ning for all of the progress it has helped us make in our classrooms and reflect on all they have given us for free. For now we can take solace in the fact that at least
the music didn’t die - yet.

Henry Thiele - cross posted a t
http://www.techlearning.com/section/Blogs


Wednesday, April 14, 2010

My Bookmarks and Annotations 04/14/2010

  • Safety for Educators
    There are a number of Facebook best practices for educators, particularly when it involves the safety of their students. Find them here.

    tags: facebook, cybersafety, education, safety, digitalcitizenship


  • It has never been easier to find the perfect cell phone plan. What once took hours visiting retail stores can now be completed in just a few minutes, all from the convenience of your home or office. Once you find the ideal cell phone plan, you'll be able to pair it with a cell phone special offer. MyRatePlan features one of the widest selections of cell phones, at the best prices, available anywhere. We look forward to saving you both time and money on the purchase of your next cell phone and plan.

    tags: cell, phone, mobile, plans, cellphone


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

My Bookmarks and Annotations 04/13/2010

  • tags: DI

  • Not all students are alike. Based on this knowledge, differentiated instruction applies anapproach to teaching and learning so that students have multiple options for taking ininformation and making sense of ideas. The model of differentiated instruction requiresteachers to be flexible in their approach to teaching and adjusting the curriculum andpresentation of information to learners rather than expecting students to modify themselvesfor the curriculum. Classroom teaching is a blend of whole-class, group and individualinstruction. Differentiated Instruction is a teaching theory based on the premise thatinstructional approaches should vary and be adapted in relation to individual and diversestudents in classrooms.DefinitionTo differentiate instruction is to recognize students varying background knowledge,readiness, language, preferences in learning, interests, and to react responsively.Differentiated instruction is a process to approach teaching and learning for students ofdiffering abilities in the same class. The intent of differentiating instruction is to maximizeeach student’s growth and individual success by meeting each student where he or she is,and assisting in the learning process.

    tags: classroom, practices, DI, i3


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Sunday, April 11, 2010

My Bookmarks and Annotations 04/11/2010

  • tags: no_tag

    • Multiple means of representation to give learners various ways of acquiring information and knowledge


      Multiple means of action and expression to provide learners alternatives for demonstrating what they know, and


      Multiple means of engagement to tap into learners' interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn

  • tags: no_tag

    • Universal Design for Learning (UDL), a curriculum designed approach to increase flexibility in teaching and decrease the barriers that frequently limit student access to materials and learning in classrooms
    • Principles of the Universal Design for Learning Framework

      Principle 1:
      To support recognition learning, provide multiple, flexible methods of presentation

      Principle 2:
      To support strategic learning, provide multiple, flexible methods of expression and apprenticeship.


      Principle 3:
      To support affective learning, provide multiple, flexible options for engagement.


      • Network-Appropriate Teaching Methods

        To support diverse recognition networks:
        • Provide multiple examples
        • Highlight critical features
        • Provide multiple media and formats
        • Support background context

        To support diverse strategic networks:
        • Provide flexible models of skilled performance
        • Provide opportunities to practice with supports
        • Provide ongoing, relevant feedback
        • Offer flexible opportunities for demonstrating skill

        To support diverse affective networks:
        • Offer choices of context and tools
        • Offer adjustable levels of challenge
        • Offer choices of learning context
        • Offer choices of rewards
    • UDL Teaching Method
    • Visit the CAST web site. The CAST web site devotes a large section to Universal Design for Learning. Here visitors will find an articulation of UDL, discussions of its core concepts, descriptions of UDL research projects, a listing of tools and resources that support UDL, and ideas and examples for implementing UDL.
    • Inventory and build technology support. Technology, in particular digital media, makes UDL implementation practical and achievable in a diverse classroom. Digital materials make it possible for the same material to be flexibly presented and accessedeven adapted on a student-to-student basis.
    • (a) Set Goals, (b) Analyze Status, (c) Apply UDL, and (d) Teach the UDL Lesson.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Wednesday, April 07, 2010

My Bookmarks and Annotations 04/07/2010

  • a tool called Cacoo tries to stand out from the pack with some unique features.

    Developed by Japan-based Nulab, the Flash application is entirely browser-based, free and available in English (and Japanese). Cacoo features a library of icons users can drag and drop to create site maps, wireframes, flow charts, network diagrams, mind maps, UML diagrams, and more. Much like with similar tools, Cacoo users can align the design elements to each other, resize, flip and skew them, create their own components from existing ones, upload images to include in the diagrams, and more.

    tags: cacoo, visualization, mindmap


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Tuesday, April 06, 2010

My Bookmarks and Annotations 04/06/2010

  • Facebook’s official company statistics outline the breakdown of the sites over 400 million active users. While the site points out about 70% of Facebook users are outside the United States, it doesn’t dive deeper into the U.S. numbers.

    To find out more about the average American Facebook user and how he or she compares to the average American, we dug a little further. After crunching the numbers and comparing the data, this is what we found.

    tags: facebook, web2.0, stats


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Thursday, April 01, 2010

My Bookmarks and Annotations 04/01/2010


Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.